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Kristof Spiewok

Kristof Spiewok studied music theatre direction at the Hochschule für Musik Hanns Eisler in Berlin under the direction of Peter Konwitschny and Ruth Berghaus.He was awarded his diploma for his interpretation of Mozart’s “Apollo et Hyacinthus”, performed at the Semperoper Dresden.He worked as assistant to Peter Konwitschny at the Semperoper, Theater Basel and Oper Leipzig and as assistant director at the Nationaltheater Mannheim. He has also collaborated with Stein Winge, Robert Carsen and Sebastian Baumgarten, and worked as visiting director with Keith Warner and Simon Philipps at the Hamburgische Staatsoper. He worked as artistic associate at opera classes at music high schools in Graz and Dresden, and as opera mentor in Prof. Andreas Reinhardt’s stage design classes at the Academy of Fine Arts in Dresden. His first individual project was the world premiere of Rilke’s “Die Weiße Fürstin” (conducted by Johannes Wulff-Woesten); he went on to arrange Giovanni Alberto Ristori’s Baroque opera “Calandro” (stage version of Franz Schubert’s “Die Winterreise”) and Paul Hindersmith’s “Sancta Susanna”. He has also worked on Christian Gottlob Neefe’s “Amors Guckkasten” at the Theater Chemnitz, Maria Antonia Walpurgis’ Baroque opera “Talestri” at the Münchner Cuvilliés-Theater, Beethoven’s “Fidelio” at the Theater Brandenburg and Michael Nyman’s “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat” at the Nationaltheater Mannheim.

Kristof Spiewok is currently engaged at the Oper Leipzig as director and associate of Dietrich Hilsdorf.He has taken part in the Monteverdi/Ligeti project at the Kellertheater and the subsequent project by the Oper Leipzig alongside Schaubühne Lindenfels.During the 2015/2016 season he staged Boris Blacher’s “Die Nachtschwalbe”, and during the 2017/2018 season he is working with Schaubühne Lindenfels again on the spectacle “Au revoir, Euridice” closing the Monteverdi/Ligeti project.